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Frigate ‘Cristóbal Colón’ returns home after a collaboration deployment with the Royal Australian Navy - Navy News - Armada Española - Ministerio de Defensa - Gobierno de España

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Tuesday, 22 August 2017 - document to 03:54:29
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Deployment in Australia

Frigate ‘Cristóbal Colón’ returns home after a collaboration deployment with the Royal Australian Navy
It was the second deployment of a Spanish Navy warship in Australia after the AOR ‘Cantabria’ in 2013
Thursday, August 10, 2017


Spanish Navy frigate ‘Cristóbal Colón’ (F-105) has just arrived at her homeport in Ferrol (NW Spain) after a collaboration deployment with the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

The previous deployment of a Spanish warship in Australia was the auxiliary oiler and replenishment ship ‘Cantabria’ in 2013. It was an excellent opportunity to test the interoperability with a non-NATO navy, and thanks to that successful collaboration endeavor, and upon request of the RAN, this new deployment was also gladly arranged.

While in Australian waters, the F-105 took part in several national and international exercises, embarking up to 12 rotating crews of the future ‘Hobart’-class AWD destroyers, similar to our F-100 AEGIS-equipped frigates like the ‘Cristóbal Colón’.

This new deployment has highlighted the perfect interoperability between allied services with excellent training opportunities and exchange of expertise and know-how. At the same time, the Spanish Navy has contributed to the efforts of the Spanish shipbuilding industry by providing a valuable platform for training purposes to an allied customer.

During the transits to and from Australia, the ‘Cristóbal Colón’ provided support to different ongoing international operations like ‘Sea Guardian’ and ‘Sophia’ in the Mediterranean, the counter-piracy Operation ‘Atalanta’ in the Indian Ocean and Exercise UNITAS in the Pacific Ocean with other Latin-American navies.

The deployment has lasted 214 days, 162 of which were days at sea sailing a total of 40,000 miles.

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